Helmet Step by Step-Half Man

Helmet Step by Step-Half Man tutorial walks readers thru painting a Cyborg helmet design with easy to follow directions. I’ve found this design sells like crazy; so much I get tired of doing it. Got to pay the bills though so when asked to do this design for a customer I try and change something in the design every time just to keep it interesting. Although this article covers airbrushing a motorcycle helmet many of the techniques (masking techniques) can be applied to other surfaces. I was asked on the forum how I did the wires so here it is with a little added extra on how I did the teeth. By Don Johnson, airbrushgallery.com

Airbrush Supplies Required:

House of Kolor paint systemSpray Mask, Iwata HP-CS

 

motorcycle helmet

We begin with a new white full face helmet for this design. I’ve gotten to the point I only work on new helmets for customers; black or white solid color helmets. Avoid working on helmets with factory graphics you will never hide those factory graphics they will just continue to bleed thru anything you try and paint on top of them. After taping all the trim off, scuffing the helmet, washing it I applied House of Kolor Orion Silver to the half of the helmet that will be our Cyborg leaving the other half white. To accomplish this I use a mini spray gun or touch up gun, no masking just let the silver fade down into the white. Two coats of House of Kolor UC 35 clear are applied as I do not like working on base colors unprotected. Its much easier to lay graphics out on a scuffed clear coat surface then try and do it on a freshly painted unprotected base color. I’m not a big fan of inter coat clears like SG 100 they seems to create more problems than they are worth for this type of application.

 

scuff pads
helmet scuffed

After the clear has been given 24 hours to dry the entire helmet is scuffed once again getting it ready to add the art work. For those of you who have not used a Scotch Brite pad I included pictures above of the pads I use, medium pad. With scuffing you are just knocking off the shine of the surface to provide some tooth for the paint you are about to apply something to bite into, adhering to.

 

 

spray mask

Masking objects that are not flat is always a problem, getting the masking material to lay flat, wrinkle free that is. To add the lower jaw and teeth to my Cyborg design I use Metalflake Spray Mask (thanks to Mick Cassidy for turning me on to this stuff) as masking material. It conforms real well and is easy to lay your design out on after which cutting the design out is a breeze.

 

spray mask applied

To apply the spray mask I use a cheap hairy brush applying three coats allowing 45 between coats. Here you can see what it looks like after being applied before it dries; after it dries it pretty much transparent and pretty smooth.

 

time to dry completely.

Above is the spray mask after it has been given time to dry completely.

 

drawing the design

With the spray mask dry the design layout can be accomplished easily by using a pen and drawing directly on the mask. Here you can see I have started laying out the teeth, upper and lower jaw of our Cyborg.

 

drawing jaw

In this picture you can see I’m working on the human side of the helmet which I left white; it will be much easier to get a good skull color from a base of white. Here I’m seeing where placing the upper part of the lower jaw and lower part of the upper jaw will look best. As you can see I’ve changed this several times simply by Xing out lines that will be no longer used in the design

 

cut design out

Once I’m happy with the way the design fits the helmet it just a matter of cutting different pieces out and adding color. Above you can see I’ve chosen to start with the darkest color in the recessed areas between the teeth and jaws. I use a X -Acto knife applying very little pressure letting the new blade do the cutting, once cut its easy to pull the masking from the area you wish to add color too.

 

airbrushing teeth
airbrushing teeth

With my dark color applied to the recessed areas (House of Kolor KK Root Beer) I pull the masking off the teeth and apply Glad Press and Seal to mask these tiny areas. Again using a X Acto knife I cut each tooth out of the Press and Seal. As you can see above the teeth are already a nice bright white from the original base color of the helmet.

 

airbrushing wires

Now to tackle those wires in our Cyborg design I cut the masking and remove it from the areas where the wires will be. Using just House of Kolor base SG colors I simply free hand my first group of wires in place.

 

applying fine line tape

Once the first color wires have been given 30 minutes or so to dry I use 1/8th inch fine line tape to mask the wires off. For smaller wires you of course would use 1/16th inch fine line tape to mask the wires off. With my first group of wires covered I chose another base color and add another group of wires.

 

design completed

Repeating the process of masking the wires off the third color is used to produce a third group of wires.

 

airbrushing black

Using the same dark tone you used to paint the recessed areas of the jaw, teeth we apply it to the area between the jaw and back of the skull and our little window in the back of the skull. I would avoid using a solid black color here and leave the area with high lighted and shadow areas just to make it interesting.

 

airbrush wires

Pull all your fine line tape and there you have a very nice group of different colored wires. There is NO reason this same technique can not be applied when painting a T Shirt, craft, bird house, illustration fine line tape will work just as well on those surfaces. All that is left to do is to go back in and free hand in some shadows on wires which would be beneath another as the wires cross and you’re done. There you have it a pretty simple, quick and easy way to create a group of lines, wires having different colors.

helmet finished
helmet finished
helmet finished

Above the Cyborg helmet after clear coat is applied for the last time. This a great selling design as I said before; please feel free to take it add your own touchs, hope it makes you some extra Christmas money as it has for me.

Grit Selection

Grit selection tutorial covers choosing the proper sand paper grit when sanding cars, trucks, boats, and many other metal or fiberglass items.

 

by Gary KinseyGary Kinsey has been a salesman for R&E Paint Supply for the last 12 years. He has a very proficient knowledge of the PBE industry and is a well trained customer service representative.R&E Paint Supply57 Avalon LaneMT Home, Ar. 726531-800-316-6595Abrasive Grit Selection:24 – 80 Grit – is used for stripping paints and undercoats off metal
surfaces. These grits can also be used for grinding spot welds,
removing heavy surface rust and leveling out plastic body filler. In
fiberglass repair these grits would be used for quick removal of excess
fiberglass, body filler, and roughing up the surface for a repair. These grits
may come in many different designs and cuts of paper. Just to name a few:
3″, 5″, 6″, & 8″ D.A. (dual action) sandpaper, 2-3/4″ x
16″, & 2-3/4″ x 17 1/2″ Longboard paper, 5″, 7″, & 9
1/8″ Fiber discs, and 2″ & 3″ Roloc or speed lock discs. There are
many other applications and designs but these are the most popular in
automotive and marine applications.100 – 180 Grit — is used for stripping paints and undercoats off metal
surfaces, feathering out old paint and primer finishes, and smoothing out
plastic body filler. These grits may come in many different designs and
cuts of paper. Just to name a few: 3″, 5″, 6″, & 8″
D.A. (dual action) sandpaper, 2-3/4″ x 16″, & 2-3/4″ x 17 1/2″ Longboard paper, and 9″ x 11″ WetorDry sheet paper, and standard 9″ x 11″ dry sanding paper. Each abrasive manufacturer offers several different attachment systems. There are many other applications and designs but these are the most popular in automotive and marine applications.

220 – 320 Grit – is used for feathering out old finishes, smoothing
out plastic body fillers, leveling primer surfacers, and stripping paint off
plastic or rubber parts. These grits may come in many different designs and
cuts of paper. Just to name a few: 3″, 5″, 6″, & 8″
D.A. (dual action) sandpaper, 2-3/4″ x 45 yds., & 2-3/4″ x 17 1/2″ Longboard paper, and 9″ x 11″ WetorDry sheet paper, and standard 9″ x 11″ dry sanding paper. Each abrasive manufacturer offers several different attachment systems. There are many other applications and designs but these are the most popular in automotive and marine applications.

360 – 400 Grit – is used for blocking.( Blocking is a term used
for the process in which the primer surfacer or the finish is sanded with a
flat block. (usually 6″ to 36″ long) in a crisscross pattern. When sanding, pull the block one direction about 4-6 passes then pull across in the opposite direction 4-6 passes in an X pattern. This will give you a flat surface. If you sand in an — inline pattern it will tend to dig a groove into the primer and result in a wavy finish when painted.) These can also be used to sand plastics and urethane bumpers prior to refinishing. These grits may come in many different designs and cuts of paper. Just to name a few: 3″, 5″, 6″, & 8″ D.A. (dual action) sandpaper, 2-3/4″ x 45 yds., & 2-3/4″ x 17 1/2″ Longboard paper, and 9″ x 11″ WetorDry sheet paper, and standard 9″ x 11″ dry sanding paper. Each abrasive manufacturer offers several different attachment systems. There are many other applications and designs but these are the most popular in automotive and marine applications.

600 – 800 Grit – is used to finish sand primer and older OEM finishes
that will be repainted. These grits aren’t usually used for blocking
(for meaning of blocking look at the section 360 – 400 Grit). The main purpose of these are to sand out the scratches that are left behind after using a coarser grit paper. These grits may come in many different designs and cuts of paper. Just to name a few: 3″, 5″, 6″, & 8″ D.A. (dual action) sandpaper and 9″ x 11″ WetorDry sheet paper, and standard 9″ x 11″ dry sanding paper. Each abrasive manufacturer offers several different attachment systems. There are many other applications and designs but these are the most popular in automotive and marine applications.

1000 – 1200 Grit – is used for blocking out runs, dirt and bugs out of
clearcoat. (Blocking is a term used for the process in which the clear coat
is sanded with a flat block. (usually 6″ to 36″ long) in a crisscross pattern. When sanding, pull the block one direction about 4-6 passes then pull across in the opposite direction 4-6 passes in an X pattern. This will give you a flat surface. If you sand in an —- inline pattern it will tend to dig a groove into the clear and result in a wavy finish.) These grits may come in many different designs and cuts of paper. Just to name a few: 3″, 5″, 6″, & 8″ D.A. (dual action) sandpaper and 9″ x 11″ WetorDry or 5-1/2″ x 9″ WetorDry sheet paper. Each abrasive manufacturer offers several different attachment systems. There are many other applications and designs but these are the most popular in automotive and marine applications.

1500 – 4000 Grit – is used for sanding or polishing out dirt, runs, orange peel, bugs and other imperfections in the finish clearcoat. These grits may come in many different designs and cuts of paper. Just to name a few: 3″, 5″, 6″, & 8″ D.A. (dual action) sandpaper, 1-3/8″ Finessing discs, and 9″ x 11″ Wet or Dry or 5-1/2″ x 9″ Wet or Dry sheet paper. Each abrasive manufacturer offers several different attachment systems. There are many other applications and designs but these are the most popular in automotive and marine applications. I hope this will be of assistance when selecting the correct grit for sanding.

Harley Tank Mural Airbrush Tutorial

By Patrick Charuel

http://p.charuel.free.fr

Patrick runs a custom painting shop in France and I can’t thank him enough for all is help over the years. Here is a great tutorial “Harley Mural Painting” by Patrick on his technique for airbrush a mural onto a Harley tank.n Brought to you by Airbrush Technique Magazine now published monthly.

tribal design layout

Step 1--The tank has been sanded before applying three coats of spray putty (epoxy premier). After allowing the proper drying time, the tank has been sanded with P1000 wet grit paper.*For base coat I spray two coats of silver. Directly on the base coat I use 3M 1/8 th inch fine line tape to lay out the tribal design.

 

mask bottom of the design
sun gold metallic

Step2 —Using transfer tape and masking tape I protect the low part of the design and the tribal design while I apply base coat of sun gold metallic to the top part of the tank.

 

two coats sg100

Step 3 —-I spray two coats of House of Kolor SG100 mixed with orange candy over the sun gold metallic.

 

two coats of SG100 mixed with purple candy

Step 4 —-I remove all the masking from the bottom half of the tank and mask off the orange candy on the top half of the tank. The bottom half of the tank will get two coats of SG100 mixed with purple candy.

 

out line black

Step5 —-After allowing for purple candy to dry completely I remove all the masking tape leaving just the 3M fine line tape. With very thin black I shadow the 3M fine line tape edge before removing it. With a stencil I outline and dark the tribal design to give it more depth. With dermal tool I add a small design into the tribal to make it look more interesting.

 

colors play off each other very nicely.

Step 5 —-Here is the result of the base coat up to this point; the colors play off each other very nicely.

 

lettering

Step 6-–Using my plotter I cut the main parts of my Harley logo design and place it on over the tank. I protect all around the logo with transfer tape to control over spray and keep paint off my newly painted base coat.

 

spray the Harley logo

Step 7 — I spray the Harley logo a nice silver color which should stand out fairly well on my base coats.

 

pin striping brush and silver HOK paint

Step 8 —-With a pin striping brush and silver HOK paint I continue to build the logo letters. Then I spray a very thin coat of ultra thinned white paint to shadow the letters.

 

start mural

Step 9 —- Now, it’s time to start the skull design. I print the design and take the negative part to fill it with thin white protecting the tank with transfer tape. To avoid too much paint on the stencil border I spray the white paint just in the stencil center and let the overspray outline the design. Creating a big edge along the stencils edge will mean more work when clear coating so you should try top avoid it.

 

adding detail

Step 10 —– With slide and graphite pencil I transfer the face details. With my 0.2 airbrush and very thin black I come back over it by free hand and build slowly the face shadows. To avoid hard lines the entire design will be free hand with the airbrush tip at few millimeters from the surface.

 

continuing with detail

Step 11—-With slide and graphite pencil I transfer the face details. With my 0.2 airbrush and very thin black I come back over it by free hand and build slowly the face shadows. To avoid hard lines the entire design will be free hand with the airbrush tip at few millimeters from the surface.

 

detailing the face

Step 12-–Here a picture of the details. For info: teeth are 2 millimeters high.

 

build the skull

Step 13—- I continue to build the skull with ultra thin black paint. With oxide red I start to put some colour in the design.

 

transparent orange

Step 14—-With transparent orange I continue to give more colour to the design.

 

add more depth

Step 15 —With thin white and low pressure, I give more depth to the full design I also bring out the high lights more.

 

high lights

Step 16 —-I work alternatively with the white paint and the transparent orange colour. I come back over the dark parts and shadows with transparent purple colour. The mix between orange and purple give a nice burn dark colour, better than if I had used black paint.

 

orange pearl added

Step 17—–For more effect under the sun I spray a very thin coat of SG100 mixed with orange pearls right over the letters and colour the letters with the orange candy used for the top part. With white I also add few light points over the letters.

 

finished tank
finished tank 2
finished tank 3
finished tank 4

The tank receive 3 coats of 2 part clear.?After drying time I sand the clear with 600 wet grit paper. Then I spray two more coats of 2 part clear, sand it with 1000, 2000, trizact 30000. I polish it with the 3M buffing system until I get a perfect smooth and mirror surface. ?Patrick CHARUEL

Fixing Run In Clear Coat

Fixing a run in clear coat tutorial provides an easy solution to a problem anyone who spray’s clear coat will face more than once, a run or sage in clear coat. Yes it happens to everyone from time to time a sag or run when applying clear coat. Even the best of the best have an off day once in a while, after all what is custom painting if not an exercise in solving problems. And a sag or a run is nothing more than that another little problem to be solved along the way.

Below is just one way to handle the problem of a run or sag in your clear coat. What you’ll need: wooden paint stir stick, wet dry sand paper (depending on what stage of the project you are on 800 grit to 2000 grit), bucket of water and of course a sag or run in some clear.

This little technique will work as well with a well cured spray bomb clear (like U-Poly) as a two part automotive clear.

 

run in clear coat

Pictured above: There you have it the dreaded sag or run in the clear coat. And yes thats my handy work who else would be crazy enough to post on the Internet a mistake they made in a customers helmet than a person whose company name contains the word airhead.

 

soak sandpaper

Pictured above: Our bucket of water and wooden paint stir stick. When using wet / dry sand paper be sure to let the paper soak for 10 minutes or so. Taken right out of the package and used even wet the sand paper might will scratch the surface rather than sand the surface. Always let the paper soak for ten minutes to allow the paper to soften before using it.

 

wrap sand paper
wrap sand paper

Pictured above: Cut an inch or two off the wooden paint stir stick which you will use to wrap the softened sand paper around.

Why use a stick? If you where to just use the sand paper lets say you would find it very hard to ever sand that sag or run out with out effecting the surrounding surface. The goal is to just sand the high spot ( the sag or run) and using the hard flat surface (the wooden stir stick) allows you to do just that with out effecting the area around the sag.

Which grit sand paper to use? Depends on if this is the final clear coat to be buffed or just a protective clear over some art work and more art work is to be added.

 

sanding run

Pictured above: With your sand paper stick you want to sand going across the sag or run. Provided there is no solvent pop in the run or sag this should cut the run, sag down in no time. Be sure you have given the clear enough time to cure 100% before attempting this. Start out with a courser grit sand paper and use a finer grit sand paper as the run, sag gets down closer to the surrounding area. Keep the paper wet at all times during this. Sand with the stick flat against the surface.

 

sand run

Pictured above: As you can see my run, sag has pretty well disappeared, at this point you might want to start using a very fine grit sand paper. If its a final clear you might want to be using 2000 or 2500 grit at this point. Be careful not to go to far and flat spot that area or worse sand down thru the clear.

 

 

no more run

Pictured above: There you have it no more sag or run ready to be buffed or with the rest of the surface scuffed ready for more art work.

There are other ways to handle this problem but this is one I have found easy to use. Hope you find this helpful, keep spraying and have fun, until next time.

Custom Painting Helmet

Custom painting helmet tutorial covers custom painting a race helmet using Vega 2000 and Iwata HP-C airbrushes, House of Kolor and Sikkens paints. LG takes you thru the steps of laying the graphics out and than airbrushing the colors.

 

helmet painting

This how to article by L G Mehtola of Sweden appeared in issue #7 of Airbrush Technique Magazine and is in PDF format for easy reading and saving to your computer if you like. Airbrush Technique Magazine would like to thank LG for taking the time to put this very informative article together.

CLICK HERE to read LG’s article

airbrush magazine issue 7

For more info on Airbrush TechniqueMagazine issue #7 CLICK HERE

Airbrushing Bullet Holes

Airbrushing bullet holes tutorial I’ll take you thru one way of airbrushing the ever popular bullet hole. If you have study and mastered the basic airbrush lessons here on How To Airbrush you find this very easy. Written by Don Johnson.  What I used in this tutorial: double action airbrush, House of Kolor base colors black, white, orion silver, transfer tape, hobby knife. You certainly can use water based or water born paint for this if you like.

pilot helmet

I’m actually killing two birds with one stone with this as I actually have to do two bullet holes for a customer. I had this helicopter pilot helmet done when the customer decided he wanted two bullet holes in the visor so here we are doing bullet holes. pictured above.

 

masking bullet hole
tape for over spray

After wet sanding the visor with 600 grit sand paper I applied transfer tape as my masking on the visor for the bullet hole. As you can see I’ve drawn my bullets holes and cut them out of the transfer tape.

 

bullet hole stencil

I used transfer tape as the surface I’m airbrushing the bullet holes onto is curved and I will achieve harder edges on the bullet hole than trying to use a stencil. Pictured above is a bullet stencil I cut out of card board; if you are applying bullet holes to a flat surface it would work well but not on a curved surface.

 

spraying silver

Now onto the fun part, spraying paint; first we’ll apply our base coat of orion silver. Be careful not to use a lot of paint here as you do not want a big ridge of paint out lining the bullet hole when you pull the masking off.

 

center bullet hole

Now with our next color which will be reduced black we’ll mark the center of our bullet hole for reference. To help us with the next two steps.

 

airbrushing dark color

Now with the transparent black we’ll add a shadow area at the top of the bullet hole. With a very transparent white we’ll add a high lighted area to the bottom of the bullet hole.

 

using circle template

Center a hole template on your bullet hole dot and airbrush some black into that area. There you have it pull the masking off and you should have completed bullet hole.

 

finished bullet holes
bullet hole painted

Pictured above are the two bullet holes I just airbrushed, pretty easy stuff isn’t it. I just need to clear coat the visor and it’s a done deal. I hope you found this short how to helpful and can put it to use in your next airbrush project. Please book mark this site and come back soon to see what I’ve added to the site.

Airbrush Maltese Cross

Welcome to howtoairbrush.com and airbrush maltese cross tutorial, if this is your first visit we hope you come back often as we will add new how to airbrush, kustom painting articles as often as possible. Airbrush Maltese Cross tutorial I’ll be adding a Maltese Cross to a Harley tank which has already been based coated and cleared. Written by Don Johnson, airbrushgallery.com


What I used in this project:
 Double action airbrushes, House of Kolor paint, transfer paper, fine line tape, masking tape, hobby knife.

I’m sure there is more ways of kustom painting a Maltese Cross than the way I will be showing you but hopefully you’ll read some techniques you can use in your own airbrush projects.

 

Harley Tank

I start out with a Harley Sporster tank that is ready to have the artwork added to it. Notice the gas filler hole is masked, won’t do to get any paint down inside the tank.

 

masking the tank

Apply your transfer tape so you end up with as few wrinkles as possible; no need to cover the entire tank just the area where the Maltese Cross will be.

 

cross drawing

I’ve drawn a Maltese Cross in Abobe Illustrator and printed it off the correct size to fit our project tank.

 

finding the center

Now we’ll find the center of the tank and draw a reference line on the transfer tape so the design can be centered.

 

transferring design

On our design I’ve traced the design on the back side with a number two pencil. On the original side I find the center of the design and match the two center lines and use tape to hold the design in place. Our design is now centered on the tank. Now go back over the design on the original design with a pen tracing the design again.

 

design on masking

With the design orginal removed you can see our Maltese Cross has been transferred onto the transfer paper. Now carefully cut the design out of the transfer paper with a hobby knife.

 

spray orion silver

With the Maltese Cross now exposed I airbrush Orion silver over the entire design and let it flash or dry for about an hour before moving onto the next step.

 

add logo stencil

At this point if there is a logo incorporated in the design add it to the design as I’ve done in the picture above.

 

tape edge

I want a silver pin stripe around the outside edge of the Maltese Cross and add 1/8 inch fine line tape around the outside edge.

 

 

 

add marble effect

To add some interesting texture within the Maltese Cross I use a modified marbleizing technique with plastic wrap and base black.If you’ve added a logo go right over the logo with your texture.

 

spray candy blue

With our texture added I airbrush a bit of House of Kolor KK Cobalt Blue over the design. Almost done soon as the Cobalt Blue is given time to dry it’s time to pull all the masking.

 

completed design

With the masking remove there’s our completed Maltese Cross complete with silver pin stripe around the out sides edge.